The Project of Compilation and Documentation on Refugees and Migrants
The University of Tokyo
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Welcome!

to the official website of the Project of Compilation and Documentation on Refugees and Migrants.

CDR, the Project of Compilation and Documentation on Refugees and Migrants, is a project run by the Research Center for Sustainable Peace (RCSP), Institute of Advanced Global Studies (IAGS), the University of Tokyo. We are continuing our research for better protection and assistance for refugees and other forced migrants such as people escaping from generalized violence, human traficking, and climate change etc.

To achieve our goal of becoming a hub for dynamic and cutting edge research on people on the move, we have reformed our organization in May 2014. Now we are a part of a uniting and authorized research body of the University of Tokyo, changed from former organization as the secretariat of the Human Mobility Studies , 5-year donated project by the Hogakukan co. ltd. to the University of Tokyo.

We have also innovated a research model to create more socially significant value of research outcomes, in cooperation with private companies concerned: COI Research and Refugee Law Lecture for the Public.

CHECK OUT THE EVENT on 23 Apr. 2015 ¦ Practical Training on Human Security I: AGDM, local Integration of Refugees, and UNHCR in Japan [Special Lecture by Mio Shindo, UNHCR Representation in Japan]

RECENT [PAST] EVENTS:

[20 Mar. 2015] ¦ Multidisciplinary and Multicultural Support for Immigrants in Japan [Organized by GLOCOL of Osaka University]

[28 Feb. 2015] ¦ Current Situation and Challenges of Japanese Refugee Policy: From the View Point of Public Goods

[21 and 22 Nov. 2014] ¦ Refugee Law Comparative Forum 2014

Center for Documentation of Refugees and Migrants

News


[May 25, 2014]

We would like to report some important organizational developments for CDR. In April 2014, the Institute of Advanced Global Studies (IAGS) of the University of Tokyo decided to officially reconstitute CDR as one of its research projects. Though CDR has engaged in several research projects since its establishment, it had been basically a secretariat of the lecture series project “Refugees and Migrants” donated by Hogakukan co.ltd. By this recent organizational change, CDR became an official project specialized in research on movement of people including refugees and migrants. CDR's new name in IAGS is the Project of Compilation and Documentation on Refugees and Migrants (CDR). Please see "Developments of HMS/CDR" for more details.

Although our name has changed, our acronym remains CDR, and our work continues to be focused on the documentation and dissemination of information on forced displacement and migration issues, to be considered from a broad range of disciplinary perspectives. Our tasks include inviting experts including academic researchers and practitioners, government officers, and lawyers to discuss the pressing issues in our field of research. In addition, by the publishing of original research and information and by providing lectures and training sessions for students, professionals, and the general public, CDR contributes to the building of a more conscious public opinion on human mobility and the future of our society. Moreover, the CDR is developing an online database for knowledge accumulation and dissemination.

In this issue, we are proud to introduce former CDR staff Shikiko Masutomi's article based on her master's dissertation, which won the Michael Oakeshott Prize for best dissertation from the London School of Economics and Political Science. Her analysis of refugee resettlement in Europe from a moral perspective is sure to provide insight into the fledgling refugee resettlement programme in Japan as well.

The working papers include an anthropological consideration of tourism and the East Japan Disaster by Professor Shinji Yamashita, and an introduction of statelessness and UNHCR's work by Mai Kaneko. In the Asian Digest section, CDR staff Kie Horikoshi explains our research project on access to Japanese language education in Japan. Finally, the interview features three judges from the International Association of Refugee Law Judges (IARLJ), with which CDR has collaborated over the years.

We would like to thank the authors and interviewees for their valuable contributions, and welcome submissions relating to human mobility from all parts of the world.

CHECK OUT THE EVENT on 20 Mar. 2015 ¦ Multidisciplinary and Multicultural Support for Immigrants in Japan [Organized by GLOCOL of Osaka University]

RECENT [PAST] EVENTS:

[28 Feb. 2015] ¦ Current Situation and Challenges of Japanese Refugee Policy: From the View Point of Public Goods

[21 and 22 Nov. 2014] ¦ Refugee Law Comparative Forum 2014

Refugee Law Comparative Forum 2014 [PAST]

Comprehensive and Effective Approaches to Human Security in Asia
A comparative forum on international protection
in Japan, Republic of Korea, the Philippines and Hong Kong,
and how international “Rule of law” and rights based approaches can lead to
quality assurance and cost effective
protection systems for refugees and others in need


Programme in PDF


Summary

We are happy to announce the 5th intensive open seminar and symposium on international protection, co-hosted by CDR, IARLJ, and HSP.

Started in 2009, this series of intensive seminar/symposium has been funded by Hogakukan Co. Ltd. to disseminate research outcomes of CDR, cooperated with distinguished guest lecturers from around the world. By mainly focusing on the issues of refugees and other displaced persons with the perspectives both from academia and practitioners, this seminar/symposium has been providing profound learning and practical knowledge to various participants and students.

This year's grand theme is “asylum system”, in which we would discuss protection issues comprehensively and systematically. By comparing with international and other countries' standards not limited to legal norms, we are aiming to articulate an ideal and realistic way of improving Japanese asylum system to more rights conscious one: a system in which the right to asylum is respected with all the applicable human rights standards.



Organizers

Organizers:
  • CDR: The Project of Compilation and Documentation on Refugees and Migrants, the University of Tokyo
  • HSP: Graduate Program on Human Security, the University of Tokyo
Co-organizer:
  • IARLJ: International Association of Refugee Law Judges
Supporters:
  • HMS: Human Mobility Studies (donated by Hogakukan Co. Ltd., FY2009-2014), the University of Tokyo
  • UNHCR Representation in Japan
  • UNHCR Representations in Seoul, Manila and HK
  • HSF: Human Security Forum (Non-Profit Organization registered in Japan)
  • The Japan Chapter of the Asian SIL


Schedule and Venue


21 Fri. and 22 Sat. of November, 2014
The Main Auditoriam [for Day 1] / Rm.123, 1st Floor [for Day 2]
Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences
Komaba I Campus, the University of Tokyo
Campus Map [no.53 on the map]
Access Map
Komaba Todai-Mae Station, Keio Inokashira Line
[the second station from Shibuya station]


Participation Fee


No Fees [but registration is required in advance]


Procedure for Participation


Please fill out the following information and send the Email to: cdr.autumn.seminar@gmail.com
  1. Your name [e.g. Mr. Chandra Bose; Ms. Margaret Thatcher; Dr. Anthony Kobayashi]
  2. Your affiliation [e.g. Harvard Univ; Ministry of Foreign Affairs; ABC Company; etc.]
  3. Phone number
  4. Date(s) you wish to participate: either/both of 21st Fri. and 22nd Sat.


Certificate of Participation


A certificate of participation will be issued by the International Association of Refugee Law Judges [IARLJ] to all who able to participate the symposium/seminar in accordance with certain standard [TBA].
♦ The certificate is given by IARLJ independently , one of the co-organizer of the event.



Agenda

DAY 1: Morning

Registration    8:30 - 9:00
Opening Remarks 8:55 - 9:00
Professor Hideo Kimura, Director of Human Security Program, The University of Tokyo
Professor Yasunobu Sato, Director of Research Center for Sustainable Peace, The University of Tokyo

[Session 1] 9:00 - 12:00
Comparative Policy and Law

〈Korea〉
1.New Refugee Law in South Korea: Context and Challenges
Presentation by: Judge Seong Soo Kim, Suwon District Court [on Skype link up]
Discussant: Ms. Hyun Young Chae, Legal Officer, UNHCR Seoul

〈Japan〉 2. An Overview and Current Issues in Japan’s Asylum System
Presentation by: Mr. Shogo Watanabe, Attorney at Law
Discussant: Mr. Hiroshi Miyauchi, Attorney at Law

〈Philippines〉
3. Developments and Challenges in The Philippines Asylum System
Presentation by: Chief State Counsel Ricardo V. Paras, Department of Justice, Head of the Refugee and Stateless Persons Protection Unit, Manila
Discussant: Professor Sedfrey M. Candelaria, Dean of Law School at Ateneo University, Manila

〈Hong Kong〉
4. Developments and Challenges in Hong Kong Asylum System
Presentation by: Mr. Billy Woo, Principal Assistant Secretary, Hong Kong Security Bureau
Discussant: Ms. Sally Cheung, Principal Immigration Officer, Hong Kong

[Session 2] 12:00 - 13:00
Future of International Co-operation in Refugee and Protection Law

1. International Refugee and Complementary Protection - Background, Core Principles and Assistance
By Judge Allan Mackey, Project Director & former President, IARLJ

2. Possibilities/proposals for future regional co-operation and mutual assistance
Floor discussion for all participants and UNHCR led by Professor Yasunobu Sato and Judge Allan Mackey

Lunch Break 13:00 - 14:00

Day 1: Afternoon


[Session 3] 14:00 - 14:25
Book Launch of the Japanese Edition of “The Rights of Refugees under International Law”(Cambridge University Press, 2005 / Nippon Hyoron Sha, 2014) and Presentation of Other Research Outcomes by CDR

Video message by Professor James C. Hathaway, University of Michigan Law School
Official book launch and presenation by Professor Yasunobu Sato, Dr. Satoshi Yamamoto, and Ms. Miki Arima, CDR, The University of Tokyo

[Session 4] 14:25 - 16:45
The Current Review of Japan’s Asylum System - Can It Be a Path to International Rights Based, High Quality Refugee Status Determination (RSD) in Japan?

1. Identifying the Challenges and Subcommittee Review of Refugee Status Determination & Protection Systems in Japan
By Professor Saburo Takizawa, Toyo Eiwa University
and others (to be announced)

2. The Rights Based Approach to Refugee and Complementary Protection
By Professor Yasunobu Sato and Dr. Satoshi Yamamoto, The University of Tokyo

3. Some Relevant Australian Perspectives & the Future of CDR
By Professor Yasunobu Sato, The University of Tokyo

4. Comments on the Review of RSD in Japan from an International Perspective
By Judge Allan. Mackey, former President of IARLJ

Q&A and responses by a panel of speakers
Chair: Judge Martin Treadwell, IARLJ Councillor

DAY 2: Morning

Registration 9:00 - 9:30

[Session 5] 9:30 - 11:40
Domestic Humanitarian Protection for Failed Asylum Seekers

1. Overview of Day 1 and Introduction to Wider Humanitarian Protection Alternatives
By Judge Martin Treadwell, IARLJ

2. “Humanitarian Guidelines”? - The current Japanese Procedures at the End of RSD
By Dr. Satoshi Yamamoto and Ms. Miki Arima, The University of Tokyo

3. New Zealand and UK Systems of Domestic Protection
By Judge Allan Mackey and Judge Martin Treadwell, IARLJ

4. Brief Comparisons with Korea, Philippines and Hong Kong
By representatives from the three countries/region

The Right to Seek Asylum - Cases Studies from Europe and the Japanese Situation
By Dr. Satoshi Yamamoto, The University of Tokyo

Q&A

[Session 6] 11:40 - 12:30
Efficiency Procedures based on internationally accepted norms - in practice

1. Formal and Informal Ways to Improve Quality Decision Making and Speed of Processing of RSD / Protection Appeals
By Judge Martin Treadwell, IARLJ

2. Quality Assurance and Cost Efficiency in RSD and the Relationship to the Core International Fundamentals - Some Examples
By Judge Allan Mackey, IARLJ

[Session 7] 12:30 - 13:00
Conclusions

Capacity Building and Co-operation for Refugee Protection in Asia
By UNHCR representatives

Q&A, Discussion, final word from each country/region and future co-operation
Panel Chaired by Judge Martin Treadwell

Closing Remark
Professor Daisaku Higashi, Deputy Director, Research Center for Sustainable Peace, The University of Tokyo
Close of Seminar

About us


Staff

  • Director
    Prof. Yasunobu SATO
    Yasunobu SATO is Professor at the University of Tokyo, Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Graduate Program on Human Security
    Human Security is a new concept focusing our attention on the development of a more humane global society for the 21st century. As such, it requires diverse perspectives and approaches, not only derived from the fields of international relations and the social sciences but also afforded by the natural sciences, area studies, and the humanities. To create a conductive academic environment for such endeavors, the University of Tokyo's Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, with the close cooperation of its five multi-diciplinary departments, launched the Graduate Program on Human Security(HSP) in April 2004. The HSP is a unique graduate program that bridges the humanities and the sciences. It is designed to nurture "human assets" which will make innovative contributions to our global society.
    The Program owes much to the time-tested reputation in research and education of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. Moreover, in order to encourage a wide-range of talented individuals to join the program, including those who have been unable to study at the graduate level under existing constraints, this program has been devised to be more flexible in its entrance and completion requirements. The Graduate Program on Human Security welcomes active participation of highly qualified individuals seeking careers in the field of Human Security, as well as those who already have expertise and experience in related areas.

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    (HSP). He holds a Ph.D in law (University of London 2000), LLM (Harvard 1989), and BA in political science (Waseda University 1982). As Attorney-at-Law (admitted in Tokyo in 1984 and in New York in 1991), he practiced law in Japan, the United States and Europe and is currently a part time advisor to the law firm Nagashima, Ohono and Tsunematsu. After working on refugee protetion, peace keeping/preacebuilding and law and judicial reform as a legal official with the following international organizations: UNHCR as legal officer in Canberra, Australia in 1991-92, UNTAC as Human Rights Officer in Cambodia in 1992-93 and EBRD as Counsel in London in 1995-97, he joined the Graduate School of International Developments at nagoya University in 1999 and then moved to the University of Tokyo in 2005.
    He has represented the Peace-building Study Group since 2002 and been a Council member of the Centre of International Assistance for Judicial Reform, the Committee of International Relations, Japan Federation of Bar Associations since 2006. Since April 2009, he has been Director of Center of Documentation of Refugees and Migrants, attached to HSP.

  • Vice-Director / Web Director
    Dr. Satoshi YAMAMOTO
    Satoshi YAMAMOTO is Project Associate Professor of the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Tokyo. He has received his doctoral training at Nagoya University (Ph.D, 2005). His research focuses on refugee in International Law, especially on changing protection trends including activities of UNHCR.
    His recent works include The Provisional Rules of Procedure of the United Nations Security Council and the Council's Recent Practices (co-written with Ikuyo HASUO et.al., Research Institute for Peace and Security, January 2009), Concept of Refugee in International Law Studies (Discussion Paper for Peacebuilding Studies No.12, June 2008, in Japanese), and Refugees, Peace-building and Human Security in Asia (co-written with Yasunobu SATO, Working Paper of Asian Society of International Law 2007/13, March 2007). He received the Akino Yutaka Award in 2008 with his research on the Border Closure by FYROM (Macedonia) against Albanian Refugees from Kosovo in 1999 (by the Akino Yutaka Eurasia Fund, August 2008).

  • Editorial Coordinator
    Miki ARIMA
    Miki ARIMA is a researcher at CDR and co-editor of its journal CDR Quarterly
    CDRQ is an open journal published on a quarterly basis. The aim of the journal is to disseminate information collected from research activities of CDR and related partners. It also welcomes contributions not only from academics, but also from practitioners who are tackling real social problems. This journal primarily focuses on issues relating to the movement of people. However, the contents also include a variety of related areas, such as governance, conflict resolution and prevention. These issues induce and escalate forced displacement, as well as longer-term movements of people. The purpose of the journal is to provide comprehensive and cross-cutting perspectives on refugee and migrant issues.

    More..
    . After working at the Embassy of Japan in the US and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) in Albania, she became involved with asylum issues in Japan in 1998 through her work with the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR). Since December 2011, she serves as a Refugee Examination Counselor in Japan's refugee status determination procedure at the appeal level.
    Her recent publications include: 100 Q&A on Basics of Refugee Protection
    This book is intended for beginners of refugee studies, but the contents -100 short questions- are really useful for everyone including specialists of this field. Legal protection of refugees is stipulated in 1951 Refugee Convention, but the details and the reality of implementation of rights and obligations are not clear. On the other hand, academic thesises and related jurisprudences are relatively abstruse in many cases.
    From this perspective, this series of “100 Q&A” is at giving basics and general outline of refugee protection, with legal and academic theories and practical understandings. Dr. Satoshi YAMAMOTO and Miki ARIMA co-authored. You can purchase it on the official website of the Human Security Forum.

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    : Refugee Status Determination and Credibility Test
    (co-authored with Satoshi Yamamoto, Human Security Forum
    Human Security Forum is a Non-Profit Organization established under Japanese law.
    The purpose of the HSF is to disseminate the notion of Human Security especially in Japan. CDR has a close relationship with HSF in carrying out its tasks.

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    , 2012), Analysis of Global Asylum Trends in 2011 (Refugee Studies Journal, 2012), Asylum in Japan: an Overview of Government Commitments and Asylum Statistics (CDR Quarterly
    CDRQ is an open journal published on a quarterly basis. The aim of the journal is to disseminate information collected from research activities of CDR and related partners. It also welcomes contributions not only from academics, but also from practitioners who are tackling real social problems. This journal primarily focuses on issues relating to the movement of people. However, the contents also include a variety of related areas, such as governance, conflict resolution and prevention. These issues induce and escalate forced displacement, as well as longer-term movements of people. The purpose of the journal is to provide comprehensive and cross-cutting perspectives on refugee and migrant issues.

    More..
    vol.5, 2012, in English), and a Japanese translation of Nationality and Statelessness: A Handbook for Parliamentarians (UNHCR, 2009). She holds a BA from Amherst College (1992) MPP from Harvard University (master in public policy, 1994) and JD from Waseda Law School (2007).

  • Secretariat
    Kie HORIKOSHI
  • Assistant Researcher
    Kumiko NIITSU
    • Lecturer (adjunct) - Meiji Gakuin University, international human rights law (since2012)
    • Refugee Examination Adjudicator, The Ministry of Justice (since 2009)
    • GRADUATED:
      • The University of Tokyo, Japan, MA in Human Security Studies (2010)
      • University of Essex, UK LL.M in International Human Rights Law (1998)
    • MAIN INTERESTS:
      • Inspection Systems in Detention Facilities including Immigration Detention Centers, Prevention of Torture and Human Rights Violations through national and international systems, Procedure in the UN CAT Committee

  • Visiting Researcher
    Douglas MACLEAN
    Douglas MacLean is a Fulbright Scholar and Georgetown Law Scholar, with a Juris Doctor from Georgetown University Law Center in Washington, D.C. A fluent Japanese speaker, he is currently researching Japan's legal response to human trafficking, particularly through international marriage migration.
    Mr. MacLean has focused on human trafficking issues for the last six years, first as a senior legislative staff member in the California State Assembly, then as a Legal and Policy Fellow at the Polaris Project, an anti-trafficking organization based in Washington, D.C. He has also worked with the UN Inter-Agency Project on Human Trafficking (UNIAP) in Bangkok, where he investigated the intersection of international marriage migration and human trafficking in the Mekong region.
    His most recent published work includes articles on the international legal response to human trafficking (UC Davis Journal of International Law and Policy, 19.1, 2013), as well as a legal examination of Korea's National Human Rights Commission and its vulnerabilities to outside influence. (Yonsei University Law Journal, 2013)

Lecturers

  • Prof. Saburo TAKIZAWA
    After completion of a doctoral program at Tokyo Metropolitan University, he joined the Ministry of Justice in Japan in 1976, and then received an MBA from the Graduate School of Business at the University of California Berkeley. He is a Certified Public Accountant (CPA) of America.
    In 1981, he joined the United Nations Office in Geneva, and then worked for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees (UNRWA). He held prominent positions such as Director of Program Coordination the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) and Controller and Director at the United Nationals High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), headquarters in Geneva. He was appointed as the first Japanese UNHCR Representative in Japan from January 2007 to August 2008. Since April 2009 he has been in his present post as a professor at Toyo Eiwa Jogakuin University. He also has taught at the University of Tokyo since October 2009. His favorite word is ‘challenge.’
    His interview is available on CDRQ
    CDRQ is an open journal published quarterly basis. The aim of the journal is to disseminate information collected from research activities of CDR and related partners. It also welcomes contributions not only from academics but also from practitioners who are facing real social problems. This journal focuses on issues of movement of people basically. However the contents also include variety of related areas such as governance and conflict resolution and prevention, as these issues induce and escalate forced displacement and more longer-term movement of people. The purpose of the journal is to provide a crosscut perspectives on refugee and migrant issues with comprehensive awareness to the issues of movement of people.

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    Vol.1.

Interns

  • Satomi HIYAMA (International Christian University, Summer of 2010)
  • Stephanie YASUNAGA (Harvard University, Summer of 2010)
  • Nara LEE (Harvard University, Summers of 2008 and 2009)
  • Yumiko NISHIOKA (The University of Tokyo, Summer of 2011)
  • Nga Hong Hanh Nguy (Harvard University, Summer of 2012)

Associates

  • Dr. Takuto SAKAMOTO
  • Junko MIURA
    Junko MIURA is a researcher at CDR. Her current research deals with social integration of resettled refugees from an anthropological perspective. She is currently involved in researching the third country resettlement programme in Japan. She holds an MA in Social Anthropology of Development, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London. She studied the human motilities between developed and developing countries as well as migration networks using Overseas Filipino Workers (OFWs) in Italy as a case study.
    Her recent publications include Third Country Resettlement Programme in Japan (CDR Quarterly
    CDRQ is an open journal published on a quarterly basis. The aim of the journal is to disseminate information collected from research activities of CDR and related partners. It also welcomes contributions not only from academics, but also from practitioners who are tackling real social problems. This journal primarily focuses on issues relating to the movement of people. However, the contents also include a variety of related areas, such as governance, conflict resolution and prevention. These issues induce and escalate forced displacement, as well as longer-term movements of people. The purpose of the journal is to provide comprehensive and cross-cutting perspectives on refugee and migrant issues.

    More..
    vol.2, 2011), Forced Migration in Japan: March 11 Catastrophe (CDR Quarterly
    CDRQ is an open journal published on a quarterly basis. The aim of the journal is to disseminate information collected from research activities of CDR and related partners. It also welcomes contributions not only from academics, but also from practitioners who are tackling real social problems. This journal primarily focuses on issues relating to the movement of people. However, the contents also include a variety of related areas, such as governance, conflict resolution and prevention. These issues induce and escalate forced displacement, as well as longer-term movements of people. The purpose of the journal is to provide comprehensive and cross-cutting perspectives on refugee and migrant issues.

    More..
    vol.3, 2011), Filipino Migrant Workers in Italy: How Do Cultural Factors Promote Filipino Migration to Italy? (CDR Quarterly
    CDRQ is an open journal published on a quarterly basis. The aim of the journal is to disseminate information collected from research activities of CDR and related partners. It also welcomes contributions not only from academics, but also from practitioners who are tackling real social problems. This journal primarily focuses on issues relating to the movement of people. However, the contents also include a variety of related areas, such as governance, conflict resolution and prevention. These issues induce and escalate forced displacement, as well as longer-term movements of people. The purpose of the journal is to provide comprehensive and cross-cutting perspectives on refugee and migrant issues.

    More..
    vol.4, 2012), Japan: Re-Determining the Purpose of Resettlement Programme
    Junko MIURA and Shikiko MASUTOMI co-authored the paper.

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    (CDR Quarterly
    CDRQ is an open journal published on a quarterly basis. The aim of the journal is to disseminate information collected from research activities of CDR and related partners. It also welcomes contributions not only from academics, but also from practitioners who are tackling real social problems. This journal primarily focuses on issues relating to the movement of people. However, the contents also include a variety of related areas, such as governance, conflict resolution and prevention. These issues induce and escalate forced displacement, as well as longer-term movements of people. The purpose of the journal is to provide comprehensive and cross-cutting perspectives on refugee and migrant issues.

    More..
    vol.5, 2012), Karen Refugees in Japan: Who AreThey? (CDR Quarterly
    CDRQ is an open journal published on a quarterly basis. The aim of the journal is to disseminate information collected from research activities of CDR and related partners. It also welcomes contributions not only from academics, but also from practitioners who are tackling real social problems. This journal primarily focuses on issues relating to the movement of people. However, the contents also include a variety of related areas, such as governance, conflict resolution and prevention. These issues induce and escalate forced displacement, as well as longer-term movements of people. The purpose of the journal is to provide comprehensive and cross-cutting perspectives on refugee and migrant issues.

    More..
    vol.6, 2013), Social Integration of Resettled Refugees in Japan (Nihon ni Okeru Nanmin no Ukeire to Shakaitogo) (Vol 14, 2013, Kyoto Museum for World Peace, Ritsumeikan University,in Japanese).

  • Yukiko ABE
  • Yasuko YAMADA
  • Shikiko MASUTOMI
  • Jordan NOGAKI
  • Joseph TABAGO
  • Magdalena IONESCU

Address

  • Postal Address: The Project of Compilation and Documentation on Refugees and Migrants, Rm.307, Bldg.9, The Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, The University of Tokyo. 3-8-1 Komaba, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8902, Japan
  • Location 〈Google Map〉 〈Access
    CDR Office is in the Rm.307 of the Bldg.9 of Komaba Campus.
    Komaba Campus is located nearby Komaba Todai Mae Station of Keiwo Inokashira Line, two stations from JR Shibuya Station. It takes about 5 min. from Shibuya to Komaba Campus.

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    to CDR
  • Email Address: cdr[atmark]hsp.c.u-tokyo.ac.jp

© All Rights Reserved: The Project of Compilation and Documentation on Refugees and Migrants